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Broadband access Digital Divide Economic Development Education Rural

Broadband Reality in North Carolina

The FCC reports that 93% of North Carolina’s population has access to the internet at the FCC threshold speeds of 25 Mbps. Of those without access, nearly 640,000 people live in sparsely populated areas.

How is internet broadband accessed? Broadband is accessed through a number of technologies including:

  • Digital Subscriber Line (DSL)
  • Cable Modem
  • Fiber-Optic Cable (Fiber)
  • Wireless
  • Satellite
  • Broadband over Powerline (BPL)

As of December 2014, only 16% of North Carolinians adopted broadband in their homes compared to the national average of 37% at the recommended speed threshold (25 Mbps download/3 Mbps upload).

At this adoption rate, North Carolina ranked 40th out of the 45 reporting states.

More details are at:
https://www.ednc.org/perspective-the-reality-of-broadband-in-north-carolina/

broadband #NCSTEMScoreCard #StrategiesThatEngageMinds #economicgrowth

Categories
Broadband access Broadband in WNC Community Development Economic Development

The 2020 WNC Regional Leadership Summit on Broadband

Over 100 regional leaders–from state, county, and city government; from area universities and colleges; and from local business communities–met at UNC Ashveille on Monday, 27 January, to discuss issues surrounding broadband infrastructure and access in Western North Carolina. To read more about the Summit, visit WLOS News 13.

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Community Development Economic Development Rural

The value and cost of broadband access: the lessons of two stories

Leslie Boney, the Director of the NC Institute for Emerging Issues (IEI) and organizer of ReCONNECT to Technological Opportunity, a five-city initiative to expand access to and the use of high-speed internet, tells the stories of a North Carolina farmer and businessman, both of whom have engaged this critical technology to benefit their work and strengthen their communities. Boney notes that for some, the benefits of internet access may not seem worth the cost; however, as he also observes in these two stories, new ways of putting broadband to work can often yield powerful outcomes. To read more, visit the IEI’s Director’s Log.