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Broadband access Broadband funding Broadband in WNC Digital Divide Education

Divided WNC?

What is a solution to the digital divide?

Digital Inclusion


1) Access to affordable, high-speed Internet.
2) Access to a computer or laptop
3) Digital literacy or skills

https://www.wral.com/coronavirus/nc-states-institute-for-emerging-issues-launching-a-grant-to-help-bridge-digital-divide/19198159/

#buncombe #digitalliteracy #ruralbroadband #digitalworkplace

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Broadband access Broadband funding Broadband in WNC Education WiFi

Commute for Internet Access

What does an individual do when broadband is not available to fulfill education, employment, governmental, or other life requirements? Is it your civil right?

Computers, cell phones, broadband, and other electronic resources are expensive and not always readily available. Additionally, the cost of broadband makes it three times more likely that households without internet service can be found in urban, rather than rural areas.

With young people soon returning to school, what is the strategy to make life necessities happen?

Doing Schoolwork in the Parking Lot Is Not a Solution


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/18/opinion/sunday/broadband-internet-access-civil-rights.html

Support the WNC Broadband Project today with education, advocacy, financial, or other resources to make broadband more accessible in Western North Carolina.

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Broadband access Buncombe WiFi

Outside Buncombe Library – Free WiFi Zone

Buncombe County Public Libraries have free wifi hotspots available outside any library building.

To use the wifi, look for the LibraryGuest network and use the password readmore.

The wifi is available all day every day, whether the library is open or not.

Please observe all Buncombe County social distancing and gathering requirements while using the wifi.

Questions? Call (828) 250-4700 or email library@buncombecounty.org.

https://www.buncombecounty.org/governing/depts/library/news_detail.aspx?id=18641

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Mobile Data

Cost of a Gig of Mobile Data

What is the cost of your mobile plan?

How much mobile data do you use?

Do the math and divide the cost of your mobile data by how much data you use and compare it to the cost of below.

Note the article lists the cost of a gig of data in the United States of America as being about $8.

https://www.younglistan.com/2020/07/what-does-1gb-of-mobile-data-cost-in-every-country-infographic.html

#mobiledata #internetaccess #infographic

Categories
Broadband access Digital Divide Education Healthcare

Call for Action on Neglected Policy Proposals

NC faith leaders make a call for action on neglected policy proposals, including broadband access.

The health needs and education needs of North Carolinians are writ large by the coronavirus pandemic, forcing us to adapt on both fronts.

A major piece of this adaptation depends on the internet. Without high-speed internet, the sick cannot consult physicians and the children cannot complete school assignments.

In much the way that the Rural Electrification Act transformed our landscape from darkness to light in the mid-20th century, broadband access can transform shrinking worlds into endless horizons now in the 21st century.

The ripple effects of such an initiative will extend far beyond health and education into most sectors of the economy.

Read more at: http://pulse.ncpolicywatch.org/2020/07/02/nc-faith-leaders-call-for-action-on-neglected-policy-proposals/

Consider supporting our WNC Broadband Project today. Contact a member of our leadership team.

Categories
Broadband access Digital Divide Economic Development Education Rural

Broadband Reality in North Carolina

The FCC reports that 93% of North Carolina’s population has access to the internet at the FCC threshold speeds of 25 Mbps. Of those without access, nearly 640,000 people live in sparsely populated areas.

How is internet broadband accessed? Broadband is accessed through a number of technologies including:

  • Digital Subscriber Line (DSL)
  • Cable Modem
  • Fiber-Optic Cable (Fiber)
  • Wireless
  • Satellite
  • Broadband over Powerline (BPL)

As of December 2014, only 16% of North Carolinians adopted broadband in their homes compared to the national average of 37% at the recommended speed threshold (25 Mbps download/3 Mbps upload).

At this adoption rate, North Carolina ranked 40th out of the 45 reporting states.

More details are at:
https://www.ednc.org/perspective-the-reality-of-broadband-in-north-carolina/

broadband #NCSTEMScoreCard #StrategiesThatEngageMinds #economicgrowth

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Broadband access Broadband Technology Digital Divide

The Challenges Facing Satellite-Based Internet

We have reported elsewhere on the challenges that satellite-based internet developers are facing as they seek to enter the the broadband market in a meaningful way (see “The New Outlook for Satellite-Based Internet,” January 28, 2020). In his article for Wired, “SpaceX is Banking on Satellite Internet. Maybe It Shouldn’t” (May 15 and 23, 2019), Daniel Oberhaus observes that the economics that prospective projects–such as Elon Musk’s Starlink and Amazon’s Project Kuiper, among others–will face are daunting at best, and possibly even prohibitive. In addition to competition from other satellite-based internet providers, Oberhaus notes, Musk’s Starlink will face a host of technological challenges stemming from low-earth broadband satellite constellations, stiff competition from more affordable land-based providers, and a potential rival in the global implementation of 5G networks within the next 5-10 years. To learn more about these and other challenges to satellite-based internet, visit Wired.

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Broadband access Digital Divide

The Legislative Obstacle to High-Speed, Affordable Broadband in Our Communities

North Carolina and twenty-one other states block or legally prevent local communities–towns, cities, and counties–from setting up their own internet service. The result–according to BroadbandNow, a website that allows consumers to find and compare internet service providers (ISPs) in their area–is often inadequate, costly, and low-speed internet service, particularly in rural and less densely populated areas. There are signs, however, that this may be changing. Since 2019, Arkansas, California, and Connecticut have joined the ranks of those states that allow municipality-based ISPs. More recently, as a result of the pandemic, legislators are beginning to see that there is a cost to the digital divide in their districts: families struggle to support their children’s digital needs for remote instruction, area businesses cannot take advantage of online opportunities, telemedicine fails to reach those most in need. To learn more about these barriers to locally developed and owned ISPs, visit PCmag UK. To read BroadbandNow’s full 2020 Municipal Broadband Report, please visit BroadandNow.

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Broadband access Digital Divide Education

Maine Takes on the Digital Divide and Provides Broadband Access for All Its Students

After Maine closed its schools in response to the pandemic and made the move to remote instruction, the state’s Department of Education realized that online learning could not equitably engaged by all students.  To address this challenge directly, the Maine DOE partnered with the Governor’s Office, the Department of Administrative and Financial Services, ConnectME, the business community and foundations, to ensure that that every student in the state had internet access.  To learn how Maine addressed its digital divide and leveled the playing field for thousands of students, visit WABI5

Categories
Broadband access Broadband Technology Digital Divide Education Federal Efforts

How the Covid-19 Pandemic Will Change Our Understanding of National Security and Underscore the Need for High-Speed Broadband Expansion

In a recent article, CNN National Security Analyst Peter Bergen and Arizona State University Professor Daniel Rothenberg explore how the pandemic is rapidly becoming a “hinge event,” very much like the Great Depression or 9/11, “reshaping the world, politically, socially and economically and … revealing major structural weaknesses in American society and undermining already fraying trust in the capacity of the US government to respond effectively to core security challenges.” Covid-19 will force us to rethink our concepts of national security and to reassess what is important to our families, our communities, and our nation. Among the changes that Bergen and Rothenberg see on the horizon are increased use of telemedicine; the expansion of remote work; the redefinition of higher education and growth on online instruction; and a profound need for affordable and equitably distributed high-speed broadband. To learn more, visit CNN: Opinion.